The sounds scheduled to pour off of BMI’s shady stage at the 2010 Austin City Limits Music Festival slated for October 8-10 in Austin, Texas, promise grade-A sonic goodness. Mirroring the acclaimed diversity of the festival itself, BMI has stacked a stage with rock-n-roll, electronic, neo-folkies, and musical melting pots who adroitly pull from it all, spanning the vintage rowdiness of Ponderosa and the sophisticated multi-instrumental rock of My Name is John Michael to Dan Black’s modern electro-pop and Caitlin Rose’s new spin on golden-age honky tonk.
T H E   L I N E U P
P O N D E R O S A
T H E   E T T E S
T H E   K I C K S
T W O   T O N S   O F   S T E E L
C A I T L I N   R O S E
D A N   B L A C K
T H E   J A N E   S H E R M A N S
M Y   N A M E   I S   J O H N   M I C H A E L
S P E A K
T   B I R D  and  T H E   B R E A K S
H E N R Y   C L A Y   P E O P L E
B I S H O P   A L L E N
R U N   W I T H   B U L L S
D A V I D   B A Z A N
R U B Y   J A N E   S M I T H
For the schedule, tickets, announcements, and more information, please visit  www.aclfestival.com/.
BMI’s stage at the Austin City Limits Music Festival exemplifies the organization’s continued dedication to fostering auspicious new talent. BMI’s layered approach to songwriter development comprises educational, creative and promotional opportunities, including the BMI Lehman Engel Musical Theatre, Jason Blume Songwriters’ and Jazz Composers Workshops; 8 off 8th, Pick of the Month and Acoustic Lounge showcase series; and stages at premier festivals including Lollapalooza, South By Southwest, the Key West Songwriters Festival and the Austin City Limits Music Festival.

ABOUT BMI
Broadcast Music, Inc.® (BMI) is an American performing right organization that represents more than 400,000 songwriters, composers and music publishers in all genres of music and more than 6.5 million works. BMI reported $905 million for its 2009 fiscal year in performing right collections. BMI has represented the most popular and beloved music from around the world for 70 years. The U.S. corporation collects license fees from businesses that use music, which it then distributes as royalties to the musical creators and copyright owners it represents.