Glimpses of Grace

An Album By

Various Artists

Review by

I’m all for hip-hop based on actual samples, loops and scratches of actually soulful and funky vintage R&B. I’m much more for it than the deluge of sizzyrup-influenced synth lines that dominate the largely pornographic rapping heard on urban FMs nowadays. Now, what else would yours truly like in greater quantity from my kin in Him when they spit on a mic with a turntablist behind ’em? Some levity, some lightness of theme and texture. It’s not like I put on a compilation, such as Glimpses of Grace — rife as it is with largely verbally vicious veteran talent (Braille, Sivion, K Drama) and newer names with game (Die Rek, Sistah Dee,  T.K. & Believin’ Stephen) — expecting a laugh fest, fortunately, the rhymes throughout GoG range from acceptable to exceptional, with tracks rich in blaxploitation boom-bap wallop. It makes for a solid collection from a new label aiming to leave a memorable mark, heavy in the best senses of the word for the genre. But yow, how about a some teeth occasionally bared in grins and not just grimaces?

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