Before Underoath and emo and For Today and breakdowns, Emobodyment were metal masters. Fan-filmed footage shows the band — raw, rough but new — just after releasing Embrace the Eternal on Solid State Records, the first of many.

HM‘s review of the record, for posterity:

EMBODYMENT: Embrace the Eternal (Solid State)

Oh my! These guys join their labelmates Warlord in defying definition. In one word: metal! The first thing that will immediately jump on you and pin you to the floor is the lightning quick speed and tightness of this unit. If you’re caught unawares by this group, you might even feel like you’re Popeye and Brutus is punching you repeatedly in the face, with his knees pinning your shoulders to the ground. … They don’t seem happy to capitalize on one riff for too long, before they run through a time change or a completely different groove and then another and then another. … The other defining part of this band is the black metal-like screeching for vocals that are everywhere. It’s not as extreme as much of the Norwegian black metal vocalizing, though, and it’s fairly decipherable most of the time. … Man, these guys are heavy! And boy have they shown improvement since their demos from 1995! If you see these guys live first, you’ll be amazed that they can pull it off in the studio. If you hear the album first, you’ll be amazed that they can pull it off live! Either way, this new band is in a win/win situation. Fans of hard music from both the metal and punk sides of the fence will embrace for this band.

Written by Doug Van Pelt

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