Cold Blood / Simple Math

An Album By

Despite My Pride

Review by

On my first rollercoaster at Six Flags Great America in Illinois, I distinctly remember the ups and downs, the loops and drops, the dips and hard turns making me feel sick, but the best parts were the ones where I felt like I was flying. It made it worth it, because, most of all, I remember wanting to experience other rollercoasters soon. That’s what I get from Cold Blood / Simple Math.

This five-song EP relies on common rhythms and metal musical devices to fill out their collection of songs. The piano in “The Beginning of Something Terrible” would have hit had it been synced up with the rest of the song, tempo-wise. The clean vocals in “Rex Banner” are refreshing; it’s a shame their isn’t more of it used on the album. It doesn’t need to be everywhere, but more than just in this one song. CB/SM starts off a little slow with some confusing and chaotic lyrics in “Little Eyes Looking into Lobotomy,” but they’re carried by the raw vocals. I’m not sure it’s intentional, but if not for the simple guitar riffs linking the verses, I’d be sure this was three different songs.

Overall, the album has some great guitar riffs scattered throughout, but the flashes of brilliance are definitely inconsistent. Some of the vocals are great, but the lyrics often feel juvenile and preachy. Imagine Jonathan Edwards’ “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” being preached by a haughty ten-year-old; it’s the steadfast resoluteness of Justice accompanying youth when the world is black and white, good or bad.

There is some real potential from Despite My Pride’s effort. I love the powerful tone of the vocals, and the moments between greatness will hold the listeners’ attention long enough not to miss them. While the album itself isn’t awful, it does make you wish they mature for their full-length to create the album they’re capable of creating.

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