Supreme Chaos

An Album By

War of Ages

Review by

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The veteran metal outfit War of Ages returns, bearing their veteran status like professionals. Supreme Chaos, the band’s seventh full-length album, brought equal parts excitement and trepidation after their previous release didn’t all-around meet expectations. But with the addition of Hope for the Dying’s Jack Daniels, War of Ages has advanced into a new direction while keeping the signature sound for which the band has become known.

Euro-metal styles blend well with War of Ages writing in a manner that does not match the chaos of battle depicted on the cover. Each song on the album is well-polished and offers new, nuanced changes to the old War of Ages, preventing the repetitive lull to which many metal albums succumb.

Overall, the songs are solid, both lyrically and instrumentally. “Lost in Apathy” bears doubt and resolve in equal measure with lyrics like “not even God can save me” and “we will fight, we are the voice of a generation.” “Doomsday” expounds the new War of Ages style, while shooting down “Lost in Apathy’s” bleak outlook. “Lionheart” is a much more hopeful, challenging song, a rallying battle cry.

The album, as a whole, is satisfying and gets better the deeper into the track list you go. Themes of spiritual battle, redemption, and Jesus Christ’s love. The guitar riffs rip, the drumming drives and altogether, Supreme Chaos causes barely controlled headbanging. A definite add to the War of Ages cannon.

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