1260 Days

An Album By

Skald in Veum

Review by

Listen now

Skald in Veum is a mystery to me. Trying to find anything on their history is a bit of a chore. It’s like they emerged from the shadows of an abandoned, smoldering tabernacle, wielding guitars and drumsticks, accompanied by a fearsome thunderstorm. Skald in Veum’s new EP, 1260 Days, is intense. Take a dash of holy water, a chainsaw, a .50 caliber machine gun, gasoline, shake it all up, light it on fire and hurl it into a crowd of godless metal heads. From start to finish, they pound you with extremely tight Scandinavian black metal, haunted with the vocals of vocalist Mund. It’s all wrapped up solidly and forged into a consecrated weapon of mass destruction. Growling lead vocals, eerie background screams and ghoulish ambiance reign among the tempestuous drums and guitars, really give you the feel of a fantastic, live-sounding recording. Their dynamics are impeccable; just when you have had enough, they slow it down, bringing you into a somber rhythm before allowing it all to be stripped away with the tide, slamming on the gas pedal to propel you straight into a wall of brutally distorted, well-timed turbulence. If you are metal hungry and looking for a new, dark sound that is heavy, dark and fast with a positive message, Skald in Veum’s 1260 Days should light your pants on fire.

Features

HM covers from over the years

HM Magazine Turns 35

In 1985, Doug Van Pelt photocopied a letter-sized sheets of paper, bound them together, and handed them out in person on the campus of the University of Texas at Austin. It's all digital now, but, along the way, Van Pelt stirred up quite a few waves, played some seriously heavy music, and made a few friends along the way. Here: A quick look back at the magazine's 35-year history with Van Pelt and new owner, David Stagg.

By

Full Feature
Payable on Death – P.O.D.

A Voice of Life

Almost 27 years after the band's first studio album, P.O.D.'s message is arguably more important than ever. "I believe (our message) is even more relevant now than it was then. If you really listen to 'Youth of the Nation,' we still have these tragedies going on. There’s a lot of searching still going on out there."

By

Full Feature
All Features