Venture

An Album By

New Waters

Review by

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Review of: Venture
Album by:
New Waters

Reviewed by:
Rating:
5
On March 11, 2014
Last modified:March 11, 2014

Summary:

Their situation is unique; a lot of times, the innovators (and early adopters) aren’t recognized for their genius and get passed up, like Selfmindead, Frodus and Spitfire. I hope this style wakes a new generation to a new sound, and Venture hits just Refused’s The Shape of Punk to Come did for so many of us.

Out of everything I have heard so far this year, one thing is certain: American bands are going to have to try a lot harder to be original with their songs. Some of the best records I’ve heard this year – I know it’s early – have come from outside the States. Finland’s New Waters knows their music is an art form, and the operate as if the songs are the paintings for the listener to admire and study.

On their new record, Venture, the band manages to capture a unique hardcore style that no faith-based band has matched. This young band of best friends has stayed away from the trends of American hardcore, pulling influences like Converge’s madness, the soundscapes of Sigur Ros and the experimentation of Refused.

Their situation is unique; a lot of times, the innovators (and early adopters) aren’t recognized for their genius and get passed up, like Selfmindead, Frodus and Spitfire. I hope this style wakes a new generation to a new sound, and Venture hits just Refused’s The Shape of Punk to Come did for so many of us.

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