http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/826349560/the-new-tourniquet-album

We’re continually encouraged by the flood of people asking “When will we get a new Tourniquet album?” Well, we’ve been working to make it happen. Here’s the deal: due to the current great opportunities for artists to “do it themselves”, and on the other hand the steady decline of record labels everywhere, we’re going independent on this one. Increasingly, even platinum selling artists have decided to go the independent route to have more control of their art and careers. For Tourniquet, we believe its best so that we have the freedom to make the album we want to and retain control of the final product. If the album turns out as well as we hope, the opportunity to have it picked up and distributed by a label is certainly there.

Tourniquet is ready to record. We feel the new album will be filled with songs that are destined to become classics. We’re set to work with top producer Neil Kernon, who has an impressive track record from producing many bands we all know. Making a high-quality album is not cheap. The recording, mixing, mastering, and manufacturing all cost lots of money. This is where you, the fans, come in. Our hope is that you will contribute toward the production of our new album. In return, we are ready to give back a whole bunch of cool stuff for anyone who contributes toward the new album budget.

We have partnered with Kickstarter, an ingenious platform for funding creative projects. Other well known artists are already using Kickstarter – Christian musician/film producer Steve Taylor recently had his new film funded, as did Christian artists Showbread for their new album. It’s definitely becoming a sensible choice for artists of all kinds and no doubt you will be seeing much more of it in the future.

Our goal is to raise $22,000. This may sound like a huge number, but in the world of making records, it’s far from extravagant. We’ve got until January 14, 2011 to raise the full amount. Kickstarter is wisely set up as “all or nothing” funding. That way, it protects us from having to deliver a record without the necessary funds, and allows you to see if others feel the project is worth funding. So – unless we raise the full amount, all is lost – we get no funds to make the album, and you get none of the cool stuff we’re offering! If we raise more than that amount (which would be awesome), we’ll put it right back into the band for merchandise, shows, etc. to help us continue in this ministry called Tourniquet.

Have a look at the video and see what we are excited to give back – hope you join us and please spread the word!

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