Becoming Who We Are

An Album By

Kings Kaleidoscope

Review by

Album by:
Kings Kaleidoscope

Reviewed by:
Rating:
4
On October 6, 2014
Last modified:October 20, 2014

Summary:

There’s something about music that can complete a moment. When taking long drives, the right music can emphasize the good feeling you get from seeing the world fly by you. Kings Kaleidoscope’s is that kind of enjoyable. Their debut full-length, Becoming Who We Are, embodies the on-the-road spirit and sound.

The band’s sound is a magical blend of different and mildly obscure instruments for the genre. You’ll hear traditional band instruments (guitar, bass and drums), but you’ll be pleasantly surprised to hear keys, violins, cellos, woodwinds, trombones, trumpets and vibraphones. This can only be attributed to the authentic writing and composing of a ten-member band whose mission is to make music that satisfies a creatively hungry audience.

The album brings together a harmony of different sounds with beautiful praises to God. It has a unique versatility of the sincerity of worship music but energetic enough for a music festival. The loud, powerful, performance-worthy sound remains authentic and genuine thanks to lead singer Chad Garner’s heartfelt lyrics. (Fans of Kings of Leon and Needtobreathe will enjoy his style of singing.)

Clearly an album that pushes the boundaries of worship music, Becoming Who We Are aims to move beyond the comfort zone of the inspirational genre by adding layers and unique compositions to bring out a truly original sound and uncompromising message.

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