The cat is out of the bag. Demon Hunter frontman, Ryan Clark, and his cohort, Project 86’s Randy Torres, have set out to fund NYVES, an electronic music outfit based out of Seattle, WA. The project is looking for $50,000, but in Clark’s defense, he’s very open about what he wants to do with it on the project’s page:

My songwriting has always been a bit archaic in process. I managed to find a way to plug my guitar into my computer about a decade ago, and my methods haven’t changed much since then. My knowledge of “recording for real” is limited to what I’ve seen over the shoulders of extremely talented producers and engineers over the past 20 years.

He goes on to say he’s metal at heart, and that this project is just another way to exercise his creativity:

In hindsight, it seems like we’d been working towards NYVES for years. Both of us had been so enveloped in the world of heavy metal/hard rock for so long, I think we were both anxious to explore something different. We’ll always be metal heads at heart, and I still very much enjoy writing and performing Demon Hunter songs, but in the same way I find fulfillment in my design/illustration work, my creativity is hard to keep in a box.

If you’re financially able to help and want to get some kickbacks, head over to the Kickstarter (or fund below). Either way, very cool sound and an interesting concept.

nyves

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