Your Memorial came to Facedown Records from the Twin Cities of Minnesota bearing their self released debut album Seasons, and sporting an impressive touring history.  Growing up in the shadow of such hometown bands as Martyr A.D., Nehemiah, and After the Burial, Your Memorial recognized the advantage of following the path blazed by the genre patriarchs and seized the opportunity, as well as the inspiration to make their own indelible mark on the genre.
Your Memorial does just that with their brand of progressive crushing rhythms that meld into ambient swells of melody.  Although their influences span multiple genres, their impassioned laser-focus is what makes Your Memorial a stand-out metal act.

Guitarist Willy Weigel gives a peek behind the curtain of the writing process.  “Coming into writing the new album we had one main goal in mind, to write songs with more interesting structure and flow while still creating a dynamic listening experience.  We feel like these songs couldn’t achieve that goal any better and we’re really excited to get into the studio to record.”

Your Memorial will be releasing their debut Facedown album in the winter of 2010.

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