What the Morning Shows

An Album By

The Dust of Men

Review by

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Album by:
The Dust of Men

Reviewed by:
Rating:
4
On March 11, 2014
Last modified:March 11, 2014

Summary:

There’s a vitality and desperation in this album that lit up my soul. I’m feeling spiritually reawakened and broken, and in all that still finding peace, with The Dust of Men as the soundtrack.

Music is all about feeling something.  Whether the instruments pull your heart into a specific rhythm, the lyrics spark a connection, the nostalgically whimsical emotions from your past come roaring back or if, sometimes, the music just makes you stop and think. The Dust of Men has saturated their debut album, What the Morning Shows, with Feeling, making it nearly impossible to not be rattled with emotion from their music.

The band composes what they refer to as “testimony music,” and it’s exactly what you imagined it would be throughout the entire album experience. Think back to the time of back woods Southern tent revivals, and welcome The Dust of Men, the modern-day version. The spirit in their music is sincerely passionate it becomes contagious. Their songs seem to inspire a universal union, a sound that allows you to mold it into your own.

What the Morning Shows was recorded out of Justin Vernon’s (Bon Iver) Wisconsin-based studio, and The Dust of Men even names Bon Iver as a musical influence. You can almost instantly relate that back to Vernon’s knack for storytelling within music.

There’s a vitality and desperation in this album that lit up my soul. I’m feeling spiritually reawakened and broken, and in all that still finding peace, with The Dust of Men as the soundtrack.

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