Unworthy

An Album By

Convictions

Review by

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Review of: Unworthy
Album by:
Convictions

Reviewed by:
Rating:
4
On February 5, 2014
Last modified:March 21, 2014

Summary:

Hailing from Fremont, Ohio, home of our 19th President as well as the world’s largest ketchup factory, Convictions is on the right road to carve out a name for the band as the next big thing from Fremont.

Hailing from Fremont, Ohio, home of our 19th President as well as the world’s largest ketchup factory, Convictions is on the right road to carve out a name for the band as the next big thing from Fremont.

Convictions’ newest EP, Unworthy, is a ferociously passionate metal record.  The Art of Breathing may be coming from a young band, but their sound and tone rivals their seniors, along with exceptional cleans and breakdowns that would have cynics jumping in the pit. “The Drifter” keeps the pace going and sound heavy, while “Earth//Born” had me jamming, hooked right out of the chute. By the end, I found myself eagerly awaiting their fourth and final song, “Heart of Fire.” In just 60 seconds, “Heart of Fire” gives you a great slice of the talent these guys possess. Fit for a King’s Ryan Kirby adds the icing on the cake here, to an already classically progressive metal piece.

Unworthy is packed with talent. Each member of the band is showcased well, although I wouldn’t mind hearing the strings taking a few more risks along with some creative solo runs.  The lyrics on Unworthy don’t re-invent the wheel, so while the record is very good, the formula for screams/cleans/breakdowns tend to be a bit predictable.

Overall, I enjoyed Unworthy. It’s not entirely unique, but it’s very good. This is a band that appears to be doing all the right things; working hard, a great social presence, touring, writing relevant music. If I were a gambling man, I would say this up-and-coming band will be signed soon, and would be a great addition to any label’s roster.

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