HANDS & FEET PROJECT MAKES ITS NASCAR DEBUT
THIS WEEKEND!

The Hands & Feet Project is sure to be seen by thousands this weekend! MacDonald Motorsports car #49, which will drive in NASCAR’s K&N Pro Series race on Saturday, Nov. 3rd at 2pm EST, will feature the logo of the Hands & Feet Project. The car will be driven by 19-year old Harrison Rhodes. The race is the season finale at Rockingham Speedway.
“I’m really excited to see the Hands & Feet Project #49 on the racetrack this weekend,” explained Jeni MacDonald, team owner. “I really hope we can raise awareness as to what Hands & Feet is doing and bring them more support.”
Along with the Hands & Feet Project, Audio Adrenaline will also be presented on Harrison’s #49 car. The multi-GRAMMY® award-winning band has recently reunited with a new lineup of like-minded musicians with the same common goal; to be the voice for orphans in Haiti and around the world.
“I am thrilled about getting to drive the Hands & Feet Project #49 at Rockingham Speedway this weekend,” explained driver Rhodes.  “It is going to be awesome getting to race at a track where there is so much history and where so many great drivers have raced.”
Connect here with Hands & Feet Project:
and Audio Adrenaline:

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