American Family Studios releases October Baby– a family story of hope, life and forgiveness

After a resounding success in a limited release, October Baby will premier nationally on March 23, 2012. American Family Studios, a division of the American Family Association, has partnered with Provident Films and Gravitas Productions for the national release.

October Baby is the coming-of-age story of Hannah Lawson, who at age 19 discovers she was adopted, Her first reaction is anger toward her parents for keeping that secret. Then, against her dad’s approval, she hits the road, determined to find her birth mother. In that search, she uncovers more unsettling secrets, including the fact that she is the survivor of a failed abortion.  But that trip also leads her toward hope, meaning, forgiveness and reconciliation.

John Schneider and Chris Sligh (American Idol, 2007 season) star in the film, and Dave Johnson (creator of Sue Thomas FBEye and Doc) is executive producer.

The Dove Foundation awarded October Baby a Family Approval seal and said, “This is a terrific and touching story and this film should be seen by those who recognize the horrors of abortion.” Because of the theme, the Dove review suggested that it is appropriate for viewers 12 and older.


October Baby is high on entertainment value, but its depth comes in the enlightening way it handles the abortion issue. You will laugh, you will cry, and you will love October Baby. You cannot watch October Baby and not be moved!

For more information, visit www.afa.net/octoberbaby.  

American Family Association is a pro-family advocacy organization with over 2.5 million online supporters.

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