Twin Forks LP

An Album By

Twin Forks

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Review of: Twin Forks LP
Album by:
Twin Forks

Reviewed by:
Rating:
5
On March 11, 2014
Last modified:March 11, 2014

Summary:

Though most songs are upbeat and cheery, songs like “Who’s Looking Out” strike a more somber, introspective tone – even depressing. After a few listens, the mood of the album declines from love to heartbreak. Carrabba is no stranger to a narrative formula, and this record shows he understands his fan base’s taste changes over time.

Led by the black-haired, modern-day Bob Dylan Chris Carrabba, Twin Forks finds the former Dashboard Confessional front man embracing his roots as an American acoustic singer-songwriter. Carrabba knows his audience; his fans are older now. And in turn, with lyrics that have matured from high-school romance to a story of love found with an old flame and that relationship falling apart at the seams, Twin Forks feels like a great gateway to classic folk and the Americana genre.

Though most songs are upbeat and cheery, songs like “Who’s Looking Out” strike a more somber, introspective tone – even depressing. After a few listens, the mood of the album declines from love to heartbreak. Carrabba is no stranger to a narrative formula, and this record shows he understands his fan base’s taste changes over time.

Even though Carrabba is starting over with a new sound and a new band, he still knows how to write catchy songs. Take the chorus from “Danger,” for instance: “Get home safe now / Get home safe now / There is danger at every turn” will get stuck in your head for days. And he knows how to start an album with a great opening track. Like Dashboard’s emo-anthem “Screaming Infidelities” opened up Swiss Army Romance, “Can’t Be Broken” is a great start, opening a new chapter in Carrabba’s career. He has an ear for melody, and a voice that will appeal to generations to come.

Some people say that Carrabba can do no wrong, and after this record, I’d agree with that statement. Although Twin Forks is incredibly different from Dashboard Confessional and Further Seems Forever, it’s Carrabba through and through.

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