Below Paradise

An Album By

Tedashii

Review by

Review of: Beyond Paradise
Album by:
Tedashii

Reviewed by:
Rating:
4
On May 11, 2014
Last modified:May 13, 2014

Summary:

As mentioned in the interview in this month’s issue of HM, Tedashii’s newest album, Below Paradise, is a personal journal detailing the trials and thoughts he’s had in the past year since his son passed away. Tedashii has always been a forceful, poignant rapper, unafraid to say what he needs to, getting the point across in every single way. It’s no secret where his heart lies.

Below Paradise is just what it aims to be: the rapper, stripped down and broken to the point where he had no choice but to reach out to God. The lead single, “Dark Days, Darker Nights,” is one of the most powerful cuts, featuring the talented Britt Nicole on the hook. The track focuses on the rapper crying out to God, hurting, broken.

“Nothing I Can’t Do” features fellow 116 Clique and Reach Records artists Lecrae and Trip Lee. It is a cry to the world to fix their pains with the answer Tedashii has found. The amount of guest appearances on Below Paradise is daunting, with only one track on the 14-track album (17 on the deluxe) featuring Tedashii solo.

Production is on point in every way, with producers like Dirty Rice and Gawvi (Rhema Soul, Social Club) on several cuts. Interestingly enough, a couple of track where you might expect a featured verse (like “Catch Me If You Can” with Andy Mineo); Tedashii flips the script and keeps Andy on has the hook singer. Similarly, KB adds another verse on the bonus track “Earthquake,” and Trip Lee does the hook on “Nothing I Can’t Do.” SPZRKT shows up on a couple tracks, most notably with the elegant R&B/dance feel of “Fire Away.”

Another strong moment on the album is “Complicated,” with W.L.A.K singer Christon Gray. The singer has a way of taking everything to another level, and Tedashii’s lyrical content is perfect with the heavy bass of the track. In essence, Below Paradise is just what Tedashii has said it will be: a journal of his troubles, hurts, and the grace and love he’s experienced from Christ over the past three years. Fans will flock and embrace the rapper after what he’s been through, and he’s able to offer them his best work, by far.

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