Rhema

An Album By

Rhema

Review by

The hardcore scene has come a long way since its birth, not always for the better. One coupling that became popular was mixing ambient and hardcore/metal elements, and Rhema are certainly doing the style justice with their debut EP, Rhema.

Rhema is a five-piece metalcore group out of Washington. They may be a young group in terms of age, but they bring an undeniable veteran presence to their music. The group’s first offering looks to be the tip of the iceberg for what looks to be a shining future.

The album is only five songs, but carries the emotional width a full-length wouldn’t be able to deliver. It’s successfully seamless from intensity to beauty, one goal — to spread the Word — which it does effectively. One of the beauties of this album is it never gets repetitive or muddled. Every song has a purpose, from the traditional feel of “Really There” to the drone in the groove of “Not Like You.” This album brings a lot to the table in a very captivating pitch, and the message of hope, encouragement, and a relationship with God still shines through.

Rhema’s new album is a strong release in the world of alternative and grunge. For fans of Between the Screams, A Hope for Home and Holding Onto Hope.

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