Waves

An Album By

The Restitution

Review by

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Progressive metal has been increasingly gaining notoriety in the predominantly generic metal field. With its roots stretching back to the days of Pink Floyd, more and more bands have incorporated technicality with avant-garde themes into their music to make it unique, and The Restitution does a good job of effectively combining these elements.

The Portland, Ore.-based Michael Wright (the one-man band behind The Restitution) started making music around 2005, and, despite his perfectionist tendencies, has finally put together Waves, and it works to start a solid reputation as a powerhouse in the progressive scene. The first track off the record, “Faces,” comes out swinging with deep distortions and in-your-face vocals. From there, though, the album doesn’t really follow a well-defined pattern. Each song flows from one to the next, from the melodic intro and powerful end of “Stone Dweller” to the roller coaster feel of “Weigh.” The album does have a graceful flow, in its own way, but what it really gives you is the full experience of what a real progressive piece should sound like. It deserves respect for keeping the sounds of groups like As Cities Burn and Underoath alive.

The album packs a hard punch and a smooth flow, but is still out there. The album is a strong debut release, though the randomness of it can be a little off-putting to certain listeners. For fans of As Cities Burn, Oh, Sleeper or Etched in Red.

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