Tiny Little Dots

An Album By

Lust Control

Review by

Lust Control, a four-piece punk rock band out of Texas, has brought more than just their namesake to the topic list on their latest release, Tiny Little Dots, covering subjects like bullying, greed and, of course, sex. They dish out some classic sounds and must-hear lyrics on this record.

Tiny Little Dots starts out, as you’d expect, confronting sexual topics, on the track “Fingers.” With lyrics like, “Get your fingers out of her pants,” and, “Put your face on the floor,” it’s pretty obvious they don’t fool around with sugarcoating their message. This is found throughout their album, whether it be bullying (“Bully”), ungrateful friends (“Dear John”), greed (“Make Money and Die”) and even a song about the annoyance of fire ants (“Fire Ants”).

OK, so they may not be 100 percent serious all of the time, but Lust Control does do a phenomenal job of getting its topics across in a no-nonsense, straightforward way. The truth, though, is that the music behind the words isn’t anything special. If you like raw, punk rock music, this album embraces the earlier days of punk and is a solid listen.

For fans of Grave Robber, MxPx and CR33.

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