Freedom Calling

An Album By

Jake Hamilton

Review by

Meet the new boss.

If you took Iron Maiden and you hog-tied the lead guitar players and put ’em in a green room with a gag in their mouths and you took some old hippie and put a guitar in his hand and you had the singer sing a worship song out of the book of Revelation, you would have this Jake Hamilton guy. Strip away the classic metal guitars and you’re almost there. Just put this guy’s foot on the monitor wedge and you bring in two lead guitar players that are harmonizing and dominating the sounds and making the singer project more … and you have full-on metal worship. It’s pretty cool.

Fans of the passionate and prophetic delivery of Jerusalem will instantly lock in to this guy’s performance. This live album runs the gamut from hard rocking tunes that let the instruments rock out to vocals that push and press with energy to extemporaneous and improvisational worship.

This was an unexpected gem to come out of the glut of worship albums that get sent our way. Different, rough around the edges and bold. Bold as a lion.

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