Death is Inevitable

An Album By

With Increase

Review by

Listen now

Album by:
With Increase

Reviewed by:
Rating:
4
On March 11, 2014
Last modified:March 11, 2014

Summary:

The Florida-based melodic hardcore band has truly released a hardcore album, with gravely, shouted-out vocals and lots of dirty but flowing riffs with seemingly little post-recording production, which keeps the album natural. After hearing With Increase’s first full-length, Death is Inevitable, I found out what happens when retro gets laced with relentless power.

The Florida-based melodic hardcore band has truly released a hardcore album, with gravely, shouted-out vocals and lots of dirty but flowing riffs with seemingly little post-recording production, which keeps the album natural. After hearing With Increase’s first full-length, Death is Inevitable, I found out what happens when retro gets laced with relentless power.

The first taste starts with a thumping track, and did a good job setting the scene for how heavy the album will ever get. While the album takes on a slow rhythmic pace at times, it has no trouble slipping into a frenzied furor that will please to-the-death-hardcore fans, like “Untitled,” “The Accuser” and “Get Me Out.”

With Increase is also described as “spirit-filled hardcore,” and it’s quite appropriate. They make their faith a huge part of their band as shown in their subject matter: regret, disappointment, temptation, redemption. For example, “Bones” is a fast-paced song memoir of sorts, featuring a person regretting their life of emptiness (“I wish I could take back all this pain I caused when I was trying to find the meaning of life”). In “Untitled,” the singer wonders why he “can’t learn from (his) mistakes,” something that echoes  Paul’s frustrations with repeating sins in Romans 7.

Some standout songs include “Hell For Myself,” which has some melodramatic riffs that assist with the grave nature of the song, and “Comatose,” a song of redemption (“I stand here burdened, my arms outstretched, pleading Heaven to open its gaze upon this son of regret / So if I can only sing just one more song, may it be the victory anthem of Christ Jesus alone”). It starts very slow, but leads to an appropriate climax; it’s a powerful song even though it’s the shortest song on the album (1:36).

It’s hard to keep monotony and repetitiveness out of hardcore, and at times the album lapses into some small ruts. The redeeming factor, however, is the fact that most of the are around the two-minute mark, so it isn’t a chore to sit through some of the mediocre songs. But With Increase has an album that makes them impossible to ignore. Even though it’s only March, Death is Inevitable is in the hardcore album of the year discussion.

Features

The Drowned God 2021

Drowning The Sound

Andrew Voigt, a contributing writer to HM Magazine, sat down with Cody Golob, the lead vocalist and one of the original two members of The Drowned God, to discuss their as-yet-unnamed upcoming record, the inspiration behind its writing, and a mutual love for sparkling water.

By

Full Feature
ODDKO

The Industrial Revolution

Italian creative Giovanni Bucci, otherwise known as ODDKO, has spent a professional career pushing the limits of some of the world's largest brands. HM contributor Andrew Voigt talks with the man behind the curtain to find out what it looks like when he pushes the limits of his own creativity.

By

Full Feature
Brian "Head" Welch

Love and Death and Resurrection

After an eight year hiatus, Love and Death return with 'Perfectly Preserved,' an eclectic and personal release for nu-metal icon and frontman Brian 'Head' Welch. Still at the heart of it all, the man with the dreads details his life in the spotlight after returning to Korn, the launch of a holistic recovery center, and his spearheading of an autobiographical documentary. As fresh as he's ever been at 50 years old, he's still got more to give.

By

Full Feature
Pantokrator 2021

Marching Onward

After being together for a quarter of a century, they've been called Illuminati, fundamentalists, and even fascists. Now, with their first new album in seven years, 'Marching Out of Babylon,' they're honed in more than ever, a steadfast and evolved version of themselves. Andrew Voigt digs a little deeper into the Swedish band's roots, uncovers the narratives on the new release, and finds out how a little playground spat brought the band together.

By

Photo by Rebecka Gustafsson

Full Feature
All Features