In their exit interview with Alternative Press, Josh Scogin ruminates on his history of the band. A highly recommended read. Some talking points:

I hate the imagery of “rest in peace” and the imagery of dying, and I like the idea of maybe it’s more like crossing the finish line. It’s more like we’re hanging our hats up exactly when we want to before it’s too late and everyone’s like, “Oh man, they should have done that, like, four years ago.” I feel like the Chariot were never supposed to outstay our welcome.

It wasn’t like “everybody hates (The Chariot),” but there were definitely the times where—and I take this as a compliment—a lot of times people will be like, “Honestly, the first time I heard it, I hated it, and three years later I love it, and now I can’t get enough of it.” That’s a very interesting compliment to me. I’m a fan of things that take an acquired taste.

Could we have written another record? Yes, easily. Would it have been better than One Wing? Who knows? That’s not necessarily a goal we’ve ever strived for. At no point in time did we feel like, “This is it–we can’t get any better than this.” I felt like wrapping it up and crossing this finish line enabled us to say, “Hey, this isn’t for a lack of fire.” I feel like we’ve climbed that great mountain, we had a chance to see it clearly, and it was just the perfect time to wrap it up and lay it down.

Head over to AltPress and read it!

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