Lowborn

An Album By

Anberlin

Review by

I still remember some nights in my adolescent years when I would lay outside on the roof just so I could blast Anberlin’s album, Never Take Friendship Personal, as loud as I wanted. I loved the imagery their songs contained, allowing me to take a tiny holiday from my own brain, if only for a little while.

Their newest and final album, Lowborn, imaginative and perceptive. This is best exemplified by the tracks “Birds of Prey” and “Hearing Voices,” two of my favorite songs on the album that do this best. The instruments sound well-mixed, and the lyrics are all very well-scripted. It’s the sound of a decade-old, well-oiled machine. I find it most impressive, then, how well it comes together, despite each band member using the producer of their choice. When you combine the creative talents of Aaron Marsh, Matt Goldman and Aaron Sprinkle, it is hard to go wrong. “Dissenter” is a more intense song while the rest of the album is not, so it didn’t wholly fit the puzzle, but the album runs together nicely around this startling cringe.

If you’ve kept with Anberlin up to this point, you should be obligated to give Lowborn your attention. It’s the closing chapter to Anberlin’s story, and no one stops a television series when finale is on the horizon. It’s sad this era must end, but this significant finish makes for a special conclusion.

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