Beyond Woodward

An Album By

XINR

Review by

This hard-working metal band from Oregon should have been one of the pioneers of Christian metal in the early ’80s along with Saint, Bride, Leviticus and Messiah Prophet. Instead, the band sputtered and stalled after singer Tony Saiz and guitarist Shaun Tramel were tragically killed in a motorcycle accident in November 1984. Without releasing any official albums, the band’s name (pronounced ex-sinner) was nearly forgotten. This 2008 release compiles most of XINR’s songs. Production is still rough, but the record does show us a traditional metal band in the vein of Paul Di’Anno-era Iron Maiden that would have been head and shoulders above the competition in 1984, and is still quite fresh and exciting today. Very rare, but a must-have if you like late ’70s or early ’80s metal.

Features

Atreyu- 2021

Atreyu's Baptism

At their core, Atreyu is a hard rock band with metal riffs and pop choruses. Now, after more than 20 years, the band has stepped boldly into their next chapter with a change in lineup and an album that proves the lifeblood of Atreyu is stronger than ever.

By

Photo by Ashley Osborn

Full Feature
Heaven's Metal: An Oral History of the Genesis of Christian Metal

Heaven's Metal

When rock emerged from blues and 'heavy metal' began to surface, faith-based metal acts also rose to start their own journeys. Initially shunned by both believers and non-believers, they were fighting for their spot at the table, ultimately building a legacy that would go on to change the genre forever. HM presents an oral history of the beginning of Christian metal music, featuring Guardian, Tourniquet, Holy Soldier, Whitecross, and, of course, Stryper.

By

Full Feature
Imperial Triumphant - 2021

Alphaville’s Metal Renaissance

With influences that span Miles Davis and Stravinsky to Geddy Lee and Les Claypool, jazz metal force Imperial Triumphant is the epitome of genre-bending. HM contributing writer Andrew Voigt spoke with the band about their unique style, the massive bass presence in their music, and the rise and fall of civilization.

By

Photo by Alex Krauss

Full Feature
All Features