New Session Video:

Mat Kearney

Pop music tends to transcend tastes because of its’ universal appeal to human emotion. Trying to categorize the music of Mat Kearney runs this ubiquitous pool of genres: singer/songwriter, rock, blues, and soul smashed together into tunes that feel like a familiar friend, and never seem to lose replay value. Mat played three tunes for us, each telling of his talent as a songwriter. He thumbed his way through his big radio hit, “Hey Mama”, which many will recognize by its signature refrain (playing now on stereo sets across the country), but don’t overlook the other unique, valuable moments of Mat’s performance. Much of Mat’s work is deeply personal, and it shows in his song’s emotional tapestry. We’re talking about the vulnerable “Ships In The Night”, a bundle of nerves that Mat has never performed acoustically before, and the anecdotal “Rochester”, the story of his father’s early life and meeting his mother.

All three appear on Mat’s new album, Young Love, but there is something special about experiencing them under a beautiful blue sky with nothing but an acoustic guitar and Matt’s warm, rustic voice. He said it best in our interview; “if [the songs] are really good, they tend to stand up with just the guitar, regardless of the beats or the grooves or whatever else is going on”. See how well Mat’s songs stand up for yourself.

Watch the Session Video

Watch the Exclusive Interview


Watch the full video at Baeblemusic.com

Features

Seaway

Seaway's Big Fall

Planned for the summer, 'Big Vibe' was moved to the Fall as COVID swept the nation. It turns out, the vibes were exactly the breath of fresh air we needed. HM contributing writer Danielle Martin talks with Seaway vocalist Ryan Locke about the band's new era, how they formed their sound for 2020, and why Harry Styles belongs in their lives.

By

Full Feature
Payable on Death – P.O.D.

A Voice of Life

Almost 27 years after the band's first studio album, P.O.D.'s message is arguably more important than ever. "I believe (our message) is even more relevant now than it was then. If you really listen to 'Youth of the Nation,' we still have these tragedies going on. There’s a lot of searching still going on out there."

By

Full Feature
All Features