Facebook Twitter Plaxo linkedIn RSS

Kramer Electronics is pleased to announce the introduction of the TP-581T HDMI line transmitter, the TP-582T HDMI switcher/line transmitter, and the TP-582R HDMI DA/line receiver.  These products employ HDBaseT technology to pass HDMI, IR, RS-232, and Ethernet signals over twisted pair cable.

The TP-581T and TP-582R are a twisted pair transmitter and receiver for HDMI, 100BaseT Ethernet, bidirectional RS-232 and IR signals.  The TP-581T converts HDMI,   100BaseT Ethernet, RS-232 and IR input signals to an HDBaseT twisted pair signal.  The TP-582R converts the HDBaseT signal back to HMDI, 100BaseT Ethernet, RS-232 and IR signals and provides dual HDMI outputs.  The TP-582R also de-embeds the audio in the HDMI stream to an S/PDIF and TOSLINK® digital audio output.  The TP-582T differs from the TP-581T in that it has 2 HDMI inputs and can switch between the two inputs.

These three models employ HDBaseT technology that transmits more data over longer distances than typical twisted pair transmitters and receivers for HDMI signals.

When used in conjunction with the TP-582R receiver, the TP-581T and TP-582T transmitters have a system range of up to 330 feet (100 meters) at the maximum resolution of 1080p.  The units support a maximum bandwidth of 6.75Gbps, or 2.25Gbps per graphics channel.  Each product features LED status indicators for input, output, link and power.  These units are HDMI and HDTV compatible, and are HDCP compliant.

The TP-581T, TP-582T, and TP-582R are each housed in a compact MegaTOOLS® enclosure.  The TP-581T sells in the United States at a list price of $595.00 per unit, the TP-582T is $695.00 per unit, and the TP-582R is $655.00 per unit.  They are currently in stock and available from Kramer Electronics sales companies around the world.

KRAMER ELECTRONICS USA, INC HEADQUARTERS 96 Route 173 West, Suite 1, Hampton, NJ 08827

Features

Employed to Serve

Forward Under a Dying Sun

Most of these days, the sun rises and sets on a world that feels like it's dying. Across the pond, where Employed to Serve calls home, they're learning how to support their latest record a year into its release. HM contributor Andrew Voigt recently sat down with Justine Jones to learn more about the band, marrying your bandmates, and their outside shot at touring with Rammstein.

By

Full Feature
My Epic performing their last final show before COVID-19

Between the White Noise

My Epic's last full-length album came out in 2013; despite a number of EPs along the way, the band's dedication to their craft, lyrical approach, and unyielding approach to let the music come naturally has made them critical darlings. Now, they're learning to interact and feed a rabid fanbase in between albums and in a new normal.

By

Full Feature
Comrades 2020

Becoming Comrades

The trio of Comrades – husband and wife Joe and Laura McElroy alongside drummer John Gaskil – is used to living in a van and touring the country. Now, their new normal has provided them with a moment to "be adults" for once. We recently sat down with the McElroys to talk more about the spiritual reality within life, how soon they'll be able to release new music, and how koalas are their new normal.

By

Photo by Quinsey Sablan

Full Feature
Tigerwine 2020

A Disparate Vintage

On Tigerwine's latest, 'Nothing is for You,' vocalist and lyricist Trobee departs from the band's last effort as a concept record to write about an array subjects. Notably, Trobee tackles his evolution from rigid belief system to an acceptance and understanding of other ideas: "Through touring and becoming close with those very people I was taught to be afraid of, I realized how untrue it all is."

By

Full Feature
All Features