In BRINGING UP BOBBY, which hits stores Oct. 5, the filmmaking Staron Brothers introduce us to the Wylers, a family unlike any other and way too much like your own.

How to explain the movie’s strong appeal to families and youth groups? Easy: this different kind of comedy about being kind of different takes four unique siblings, mixes in Bobby’s 16th birthday party, the long-overdue reading of their parents’ will, a hidden stash of cash, an attractive lawyer, and the infamous War Table, to create a quirky story about family, faith, and friendship.

Chris Staron wrote, produced, and directed this small-budget/big-laughs gem. His twin brother Nick shot and edited. BRINGING UP BOBBY is distributed by Provident Films, a Sony Music company.

BRINGING UP BOBBY:  The Story

When it comes to whipping up a somewhat-edible dinner or passing along faith-focused advice, James Wyler has plenty of experience.

For a dozen years, James has been both big brother and surrogate parent to his siblings. Trusting God to lead his path, James has done his best to honor his deceased parents as he’s raised his two brothers and a sister.

Now, as youngest brother Bobby is about to turn 16, everyone returns to the family home to celebrate at a waterslide park—and to finally hear the reading of their parents’ will. Sister Andrea is hoping for the largest share of the pie to maintain her lavish lifestyle. Brother Dennis—make that The Dennis—needs quick cash to keep the anarchists at bay (don’t ask).
And then there’s Bobby. He just wants to figure out what Liz, the new girl in school, likes so that he can impress her. As The Dennis says, Bobby’s dealing with “a little bit of the teenage angst.”

BRINGING UP BOBBY is a quirky story of family, identity, and faith that isn’t afraid to show that life can get muddled. And when it does, there usually aren’t easy answers to all of the questions.

A Film That Breaks From the Pack

When the Starons were told that a Christian comedy couldn’t be made, they laughed.  Then they wrote a script.  The result? Standout humor and a Dove Foundation “Approved” rating—a zany POV with a God-honoring angle on the challenges of growing up and owning your faith.     “We were going for both laugh-out-loud funny and thought-provoking,” Nick Staron said. “Comedy can break down walls. Our hope is that the laughs disarm audiences to the point that they listen to what we have to say.”

Destined to be a family and youth group favorite, BRINGING UP BOBBY is a laugh-out-loud exploration of what it means to live out your faith … and to find humor in whatever comes your way!

An Impressive Team

With BRINGING UP BOBBY, writer/director Chris Staron completes his second feature film. His debut effort, BETWEEN THE WALLS earned Best Feature Film at the 2006 WYSIWYG Christian Film Festival and aired on US television nationally, and in Australia and South Korea. Producer/editor/cinematographer Nick Staron, along with Chris, created the PINT SIZE PARABLES animated series. Both Nick and Chris have extensive professional credits on feature films, network television, and cable—and help create video elements for the Cleveland Indians scoreboard.

BRINGING UP BOBBY showcases the acting talents of Alex Hinsky (Bobby), making his feature film debut. A singer as well as an actor, Alex has appeared in numerous theatrical productions and can be heard on several commercial jingles. NYU Tisch School of the Arts graduate Marc Thompson, who has appeared on Broadway and is a sought-after voiceover talent, plays James, Bobby’s long-suffering older brother. Los Angeles-based actress Jhey Castles, also an accomplished musician, plays Terry.

About the Starons’ Production Company: Glowing Nose

In the words of writer/producer/director Chris Staron: “Our films are challenging. They are prayerfully made. They are as theologically sound as we can possibly make them. They boldly proclaim Jesus as the only way to heaven. And they address real issues in order to provoke the audience—Christians and non-Christians—to repentance.”

A partial list of Glowing Nose credits:
•    BETWEEN THE WALLS–Best Feature Film–WYSIWYG Festival 2006
•    THE ELEPHANT–Gold Crown Award–Intl. Christian Visual Media Conference 2004
•    IN THE NIGHT–Best Thriller–WYSIWYG Film Festival
•    FOUNDATIONS–Best Comedy–Good Fruit Festival 2005

About Provident Films

Provident Films, a Sony Music company, is the distributor and marketer of such well-known hit movies as FIREPROOF, FACING THE GIANTS, and FLYWHEEL . . . and the upcoming COURAGEOUS.

To learn more, visit:
BRINGING UP BOBBY BringingUpBobbyMovie.com
Press materials                 Lovell-Fairchild.com/pressroom/BringingUpBobby
Facebook                          Facebook.com/BringingUpBobby
Twitter                               Twitter.com/BringingUpBobby

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