BEC Recordings’ newest signing Ryan Stevenson is gearing up for his label debut EP, Yesterday, Today, Forever, on March 22nd. The EP has already produced a Top 15 CHR single with the title track.  Fans can go to his Facebook Page and click “like” and hear the title track and other songs from the upcoming project.  The single “Yesterday, Today, Forever” is also available now at iTunes.  This musical career path comes for Stevenson after years of putting it secondary…until now.

“When I was graduating high school, my youth pastor gave me a guitar because he felt like God was telling him to, which up until that point, I’d never played, sang or written songs,” notes the Oregon-born/Idaho-based performer.

Attending Northwest Christian College along with other industry familiar faces, Sparrow signee Shawn McDonlad, Gotee artist Paul Wright and BEC’s own executive Tyson Paoletti, Stevenson found himself in the dorm hallway playing with Shawn and Paul.

“God lit a fire in my heart, and I literally learned to play overnight. It just fit and made sense to me, so I started writing songs and leading worship during chapel services.”

However, it wasn’t the time for Stevenson to pursue this career full-time as he graduated and soon got married.  He then devoted himself fully to his career as a paramedic, working 50 hours a week.  It wasn’t until he won a Christian battle of the bands at the Idaho State Fair that Stevenson had a peace to pursue music one last time. His music attracted the attention of mixer Chris Stevens (TobyMac) and his collage-mate Paoletti, who eventually signed him.  The result is the forthcoming release.

Yesterday, Today, Forever EP is an unconventional blend of funky pop, innovative electronica and worship.  The EP release will be supported by Stevenson on tours with Group 1 Crew, Press Play, Rachael Lampa and Charmaine.  It has been a long road to get to this point for Stevenson, and he is embracing what God has in store.

“I believe God takes us through things to strengthen and stretch us and my ministry is about resonating with people, connecting heart to heart, being a source of hope and a voice of compassion. I hope these songs draw us to a new realm of worshipping the creator, breaking down walls and embracing those the world would deem un-embraceable. I want to sharpen the body and speak life and love into my generation.”

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