Country music icon Marty Stuart added another GRAMMY to his shelf last night with “Best Country Instrumental” for “Hummingbyrd,” his tribute to the great guitarist Clarence White.  The track is included on his critically acclaimed traditional country album GHOST TRAIN (THE STUDIO B SESSIONS).

“It really means the world to me to be recognized by my peers for this piece,” said Stuart.  “My main electric guitar belonged to Clarence White, the great guitarist for The Byrds.  After Clarence’s death, I bought this guitar from his wife and I’ve played it on a lot of hits and on a lot of records, but I’ve never felt like to the Clarence White fans who watch me or who actually watch the guitar, that I’ve laid down a profound instrumental that pays homage to Clarence.  I wrote this song and gave it a title that pays tribute to Clarence. I consider it my B-Bender recital piece.”

The guitar is part of Stuart’s memorabilia collection that includes such outstanding pieces as Patsy Cline’s cosmetic valise, a Johnny Cash “Man in Black” suit and Hank Williams, Sr.’s handwritten lyrics to “Your Cheatin’ Heart.”  Parts of the collection are on tour around the country and have been on loan to Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum, the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame and The Louvre.

To see a video clip of Stuart perform the GRAMMY Award winning instrumental “Hummingbyrd,” click here http://www.vimeo.com/17447543.

Stuart just wrapped his UK tour and continues a rigorous touring schedule across the US through the summer.   For tour dates and more information, visit www.martystuart.net.

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