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A short form documentary is in the works about American music icon and Renaissance man Marty Stuart.  The film shines a light on Stuart’s early life and influences in his hometown of Philadelphia, MS and the role it played in the making of his latest album, GHOST TRAIN (THE STUDIO B SESSIONS).  Select songs from the album are featured throughout the documentary short, including some candid stories behind the songs. The project, set to premiere in early 2011, is titled “Marty Stuart In Philadelphia, MS,” and was helmed by Jacob Hatley, who directed the critically acclaimed “Ain’t In It For My Health: A Film About Levon Helm.”

“The piece focuses on how music and location work together or how places often inspire and influence artists,” explains Hatley.  “Marty’s sound comes from a very specific region, and it was a real privilege to be able to go down to Mississippi and get to know the people who shaped him as an artist.”

To preview a clip of the film click here: http://vimeo.com/16711071
Stuart received two 2011 GRAMMY nominations for “Best Country Collaboration With Vocals” for “I Run To You,” the stunning duet written and performed with his wife and country music queen Connie Smith and “Best Country Instrumental” for “Hummingbyrd,” his tribute to the great guitarist Clarence White.  He is currently taping new episodes for the third season of The Marty Stuart Show which debuts on Jan. 8 with Willie Nelson as the first guest.  The show brings traditional country music into living rooms across the country every Saturday night on RFD-TV and continues to be the channel’s highest rated show.

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