In what has been an unprecedented year for FLATFOOT 56, the Southside Chicago band’s 10th year anniversary has been marked by well-deserved milestones, all resulting from the strength of their sincere live show and critically-lauded Old Shoe Records debut, BLACK THORN. Produced by Johnny Rioux (STREET DOGS) and released in March 2010, BLACK THORN debuted at #2 on Billboard’s Heatseekers Chart, in addition to healthy positions on eight other charts in its first week.

True to the band’s hard-earned reputation of remaining devoted to the road, FLATFOOT 56 has spent the better part of 2010 on tour in support of BLACK THORN. Mainstage appearances at festivals both home and abroad, a successful run on the 2010 Vans Warped Tour, and now the launch of their fall US club tour alongside Street Dogs.

Flatfoot 56 arrives in San Antonio on Tuesday, September 7 at White Rabbit. Doors for the all ages show open at 7PM. Tickets are on sale now.

While FLATFOOT 56 continues to cement their place within the hierarchy of the punk rock genre, the band’s broad appeal and universally inspiring themes have managed to resonate with people outside of the punk rock scope just the same. Producers of the FX Network hit Sons of Anarchy have tapped the band for music to use in their new season, while WWE (World Wrestling Entertainment) had Flatfoot record an all-new entrance theme for their current champion Sheamus. Never having to compromise their artistic integrity, FLATFOOT 56 manages to appeal to more than just the punks.

Flatfoot 56’s complete upcoming tour dates are available at www.flatfoot56.com.

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