Nashville will host one of the most unique creative conferences this summer at Hutchmoot 2010, which is being presented by The Rabbit Room and hosted by singer/songwriter Andrew Peterson. The event will take place at Church of the Redeemer, 920 Caldwell Lane, over the weekend of August 6-8.  The conference sold-out in an incredible three weeks and will host one-hundred attendees.  The event will spotlight music, conversation, and a series of discussions centered on the telling of great stories in song, literature, and film.

Hutchmoot 2010 will kick-off Friday night with a CD release concert by Andrew Peterson for his new project, Counting Stars.  Saturday evening will feature keynote speaker Walt Wangerin Jr. who has authored over thirty books including, The Book of the Dun Cow, which won the prestigious National Book Award.  On Sunday, attendees will be treated to a book release event with author Jonathan Rogers for his new publication, The Charlatan’s Boy. The interactive sessions will be conducted by The Rabbit Room contributors such as Ron Block, Pete Peterson, Jason Gray, Eric Peters and S.D. Smith.

The Rabbit Room was created in 2007 by Peterson after a trip to London where he visited the original Rabbit Room in an Oxford pub, where C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien and other Christian writers, gathered to nourish friendships as they celebrated one another’s gifts. Peterson wanted to create that same sense of community with authors, songwriters, and filmmakers around the world. The website has grown into one of the more eclectic places for original thoughts, lively conversation, and a place for fans to help sustain the ministry of these talented individuals by buying their product.  Peterson felt it was time to step out of cyberspace and connect with fans in the real world, which led to the first annual Hutchmoot 2010.

For more information on The Rabbit Room please visit, www.rabbitroom.com.  Even though the conference has sold out you can read more details about Hutchmoot 2010 at www.hutchmoot.com.

#####

Rabbit Room Contributors at Hutchmoot 2010

Andrew Peterson, Jason Gray, Eric Peters, S.D. Smith, A.S. “Pete” Peterson, Evie Coates, Jonathan Rogers, Ron Block, Randall Goodgame, Andrew Osenga, Russ Ramsey, Travis Prinzi,

Curt McLey, Thomas McKenzie

Features

HM covers from over the years

HM Magazine Turns 35

In 1985, Doug Van Pelt photocopied a letter-sized sheets of paper, bound them together, and handed them out in person on the campus of the University of Texas at Austin. It's all digital now, but, along the way, Van Pelt stirred up quite a few waves, played some seriously heavy music, and made a few friends along the way. Here: A quick look back at the magazine's 35-year history with Van Pelt and new owner, David Stagg.

By

Full Feature
My Epic performing their last final show before COVID-19

Between the White Noise

My Epic's last full-length album came out in 2013; despite a number of EPs along the way, the band's dedication to their craft, lyrical approach, and unyielding approach to let the music come naturally has made them critical darlings. Now, they're learning to interact and feed a rabid fanbase in between albums and in a new normal.

By

Full Feature
Comrades 2020

Becoming Comrades

The trio of Comrades – husband and wife Joe and Laura McElroy alongside drummer John Gaskil – is used to living in a van and touring the country. Now, their new normal has provided them with a moment to "be adults" for once. We recently sat down with the McElroys to talk more about the spiritual reality within life, how soon they'll be able to release new music, and how koalas are their new normal.

By

Photo by Quinsey Sablan

Full Feature
Tigerwine 2020

A Disparate Vintage

On Tigerwine's latest, 'Nothing is for You,' vocalist and lyricist Trobee departs from the band's last effort as a concept record to write about an array subjects. Notably, Trobee tackles his evolution from rigid belief system to an acceptance and understanding of other ideas: "Through touring and becoming close with those very people I was taught to be afraid of, I realized how untrue it all is."

By

Full Feature
All Features